S. M. Fiore, N. L. Badler, L. Bölöni, M. A. Goodrich, A. S. Wu, and J. Chen

Human-Robot Teams Collaborating Socially, Organizationally, and Culturally


Cite as:

S. M. Fiore, N. L. Badler, L. Bölöni, M. A. Goodrich, A. S. Wu, and J. Chen. Human-Robot Teams Collaborating Socially, Organizationally, and Culturally. In 55th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES-2011), pp. 465–469, September 2011.

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Abstract:

We describe an approach examining multi-level collaboration challenges by integrating social, organizational, and cultural factors for human-robot teams operating in the real world. We discuss the research at three levels of social interaction: within a team, within a social environment, and within a culture. We first describe research exploring psychologically and biologically inspired models of behavior to extend the capabilities of heterogeneous multi-human, multi-robot teams. We then discuss research issues that must be addressed to provide insights on how robots can correctly vary actions in response to cultural populations and geospatial environments by recognizing and properly interpreting human configurations, cultural artifacts and behaviors. The goal is to make it possible for robots to function effectively within dynamic operational and social situations.

BibTeX:

@inproceedings{Fiore-2011-HFES,
   title = "Human-Robot Teams Collaborating Socially, Organizationally, and Culturally",
   author = "S. M. Fiore and N. L. Badler and L. B{\"o}l{\"o}ni and M. A. Goodrich and A. S. Wu and J. Chen",
   booktitle = "55th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES-2011)",
   year = "2011",
   volume = "55",
   pages = "465-469",
   month = "September",
   location = "Las Vegas, Nevada",
   abstract = {
   We describe an approach examining multi-level collaboration
   challenges by integrating social, organizational, and cultural
   factors for human-robot teams operating in the real world. We discuss
   the research at three levels of social interaction: within a team,
   within a social environment, and within a culture. We first describe
   research exploring psychologically and biologically inspired models
   of behavior to extend the capabilities of heterogeneous multi-human,
   multi-robot teams. We then discuss research issues that must be
   addressed to provide insights on how robots can correctly vary
   actions in response to cultural populations and geospatial
   environments by recognizing and properly interpreting human
   configurations, cultural artifacts and behaviors. The goal is to make
   it possible for robots to function effectively within dynamic
   operational and social situations.
   }
}

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