G.S. Semmel, S.R. Davis, K.W. Leucht, D.A. Rowe, K.E. Smith, and L. Bölöni

Space Shuttle Ground Processing with Monitoring Agents


Cite as:

G.S. Semmel, S.R. Davis, K.W. Leucht, D.A. Rowe, K.E. Smith, and L. Bölöni. Space Shuttle Ground Processing with Monitoring Agents. IEEE Intelligent Systems, 21(1):68–73, IEEE Press, Jan/Feb 2006.

Download:

Download 

Abstract:

As with aircraft, launchings and landings are arguably the most exciting and certainly the most intense events for spacecraft missions. As operators of the US?s spaceport, the personnel at Kennedy Space Center are the experts at launching spacecraft, whether to Earth orbit or to a remote destination in the solar system. Understandably, the role of automation and decision support for such critical activities has been approached conservatively as a rule decision support is primarily applied to non-real-time analysis functions and automation is usually reserved only for executing well-understood contingencies when the limits of human reaction time is a factor. Nonetheless, new approaches to automation and decision support - including agents technology - are making their way into launch services functions at KSC, due to the efforts of an enterprising team. This issue's article discusses their early successes and future prospects.

BibTeX:

@article{Semmel-2006-IntSys,
   author = "G.S. Semmel and S.R. Davis and K.W. Leucht and
       D.A. Rowe and K.E. Smith and L. B{\"o}l{\"o}ni",
   title = "Space Shuttle Ground Processing with Monitoring Agents",
   journal = "IEEE Intelligent Systems",
   year = "2006",
   pages = "68-73",
   volume = 21,
   number = 1,
   month = "Jan/Feb",
   publisher = "IEEE Press",
   abstract = {
      As with aircraft, launchings and landings are arguably the most exciting
      and certainly the most intense events for spacecraft missions. As
      operators of the US?s spaceport, the personnel at Kennedy Space Center are
      the experts at launching spacecraft, whether to Earth orbit or to a remote
      destination in the solar system. Understandably, the role of automation
      and decision support for such critical activities has been approached
      conservatively as a rule decision support is primarily applied to
      non-real-time analysis functions and automation is usually reserved only
      for executing well-understood contingencies when the limits of human
      reaction time is a factor. Nonetheless, new approaches to automation and
      decision support - including agents technology - are making their way into
      launch services functions at KSC, due to the efforts of an enterprising
      team. This issue's article discusses their early successes and future
      prospects.
   }
}

Generated by bib2html.pl (written by Patrick Riley, Lotzi Boloni ) on Fri Oct 06, 2017 18:15:24